{business 101} The beginning, fear of failure, and why passion is a good motivator.

Welcome to the Business 101 series at The Friendly Home! This is not where I teach you about business. Because I don’t know anything. Yet. This is where I share my business journey with you. Maybe you teach me, maybe you learn something from me, or maybe we all just laugh and roll our eyes together.

You see, this is all new to me. I’ve never taken a business course, never read a book about business (until last week, that is), never tried to understand what makes small businesses work.

But as of Saturday, when we registered with the Colorado Secretary of State, we’re officially running a business. (Re-reading that sentence makes me kind of want to slap myself.)

I’ve heard that running a small business comes with some struggles. Here’s my first one, my first gripe: when you try to get an EIN (Employer Identification Number) on the IRS website at 10am on a Saturday morning, you’ll end up on a “please come back during regular business hours” page.

Really? Isn’t this what websites are for?

I’m sure that will be my first of many gripes.

Oh, wait, here’s my second one. Small business owners work at 10am on Saturday mornings. And 10pm, too.

Okay, so that’s something I already knew. And it was something that held us back a bit when deciding whether or not to take on this new challenge.

Here’s how the whole thing went down. Our friend Andrew, who became our friend when we hired him to re-do our backyard, approached us in November about buying his organic lawn care business, Whole Yards. He is moving out of Colorado and had started this business just within the last couple of years. It’s very small and he hadn’t had time to grow it in the ways he’d planned, but it has a lot of potential and a decent foundation.

I was familiar with Whole Yards because after Andrew did our backyard, we hired him to take care of our lawn and plants last summer. Andrew knew that we were passionate about organic food and non-toxic living. Combined with the fact that I’d just spent two years staring a gigantic school and community garden, and believing that we are relatively tenacious, loyal, stick-to-it kind of people, he thought the business might be a good fit for us.

And if I step outside of myself for a second and try to see it from that perspective, it is a great fit for us. Or, at least for me. It’s important to remember that Scott has a full time job working for a big company. So while I will always say “we” run a business, right now it’s actually “me” running the business with Scott contributing when he can. Maybe someday it will really be the two of us working together. That’s a possibility we tiptoe around a little. Like if we say it out loud too many times or think of it for more than a few seconds, we might jinx it. If we think about it, it becomes an actual goal. If we don’t eventually achieve that goal, we’ll have failed.

Failure.

The possibility of failure is what really held me back from saying yes to this opportunity. It wasn’t because our market is not very organics-friendly. It wasn’t because for the first season I’ll be driving a pickup truck with a tank full of compost tea on the back and I’ll probably spend days smelling like seaweed. It wasn’t because I have no background in lawn or landscape care. What held me back was the idea of failure.

I am afraid of failure. Always. I know it is ridiculous. I know we all fail. I know that failure is one way that we learn. But failure is uncomfortable and embarrassing. And failure as a small business owner is not like failing in your job at a big company. If Scott ever failed to do his job well (which he never does, by the way), his company probably wouldn’t feel the effects. His company would adjust and other people would pick up the slack.

If I don’t do my job well, it’s over. I’ve failed. Our company has failed.

When I was giving birth to my two girls, the process of labor felt like a long, hard swim practice. I loved it. While I was growing up, I spent enough time on swim team to know how to get through a grueling workout. I know how to put my head down, ignore the pain, and keep counting laps or singing in my head until I get to the end. When I’d get out of the pool and head to class or go home, I’d feel exhausted but triumphant. Like I accomplished something great that day.

This is the lens through which I’m learning to understand what it will take to run a small business. I know how to live in discomfort, but it’s been a long time since I chose to do so. It’s been a long time since I challenged myself like this, since I purposely put myself in a difficult situation, one where I knew I would feel exhausted and frustrated and scared, but one where I might learn something about myself and about the world. About where I fit into the world and the role I play.

What makes me most scared about this particular business is that I think it is important work. I think that converting people’s yards from toxic to healthy is important for us and for our kids. I think that if we don’t do it, our kids will continue to grow up sick and our waterways will continue to be polluted. The immediacy and urgency of this task takes the business up a notch for me. Now it’s not just, “I’m scared to fail because I’ll look silly.” It’s, “I’m scared to fail because my community needs this change.”

And that – the passion that Scott and I feel about this topic – will probably be what keeps us going.

If you’re still with me, it’s probably because you’re looking for some nuts and bolts. Here’s what this is going to look like:

  • I will try to continue blogging about home stuff, carpentry, etc. I don’t think I’ll have a lot of time, though, and so the hobby of blogging about home stuff will move down my priority list while I learn to run the business.
  • We don’t officially own the business yet. Andrew was kind enough to give us a trial period. So, while we have transferred the business into our names and we are using all of Andrew’s equipment, paying the business expenses, and keeping the profits this season, we have until September to decide whether we want to buy the business. It’s nice to work with someone who trusts you and believes in you the way that Andrew trusts and believes in us. It’s also nice to have a way out in case we discover that being small business owners is really not for us.
  • The lawn and yard care season in Colorado Springs goes from May or June through September or October, depending on the weather. Until the season ramps up, I’ll be spending my time learning more about organic lawn care (here’s the manual I’ll be using), participating in webinars with BeeSafe Lawn Care, learning how to market a small business, updating our website, setting up systems for tracking customers, talking to past and potential customers on the phone, and visiting potential customers’ homes to chat about organic lawn and yard care.

What about you? Are you a small-business owner? Do you have any resources I need to check out? Does failure freak you out as much as it does me?

3 Comments

  1. Hi Hillary, as a small business owner I know your fear of failure. Magnify that by being a single mom and there ya have it. However, if you view failure as not an option it opens you up to more creative measures. Networking is really important to me not only to meet new people and potential clients, but also to have the support of women in business. Find a networking group (for me it was and has been through the womens networking aillance) that has been hugely supportive and helpful. Plus if this is your first business that you have owned and are running you are going to probably go through a huge learning curve. Give yourself a break, hire people to help you, outsource what you are not able and do not want to do yourself. Most importantly do this because you want to do this and it is fun and enjoyable! Email me if you have any questions, i’d be happy to help any way I can!!! Love, Jenny

    Reply
  2. Hey Hillary! I love this post. It is exactly what I have felt as a small business owner. I really do think you will do great. I recommend reading go-givers sell more. I believe it is the best way to view relationships in business and how to develop the sales process.

    Reply
  3. This is so exciting! And the most exciting things are the most scary! I’m thrilled to follow along on your journey.

    Reply

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