Movin’ on up: Adjusting our spaces to kids’ changing needs

While all kids have different interests and enjoy different activities, one thing is true for every kid: as they grow up, the way they use their spaces is ever-changing. I’ve found that I can make my life easier (read: cleaner and less crazy) if I adjust their spaces to suit how they spend their time.

When we first moved into our house, a space behind our sofa in the family room was dedicated to the kids and their toys. It worked well because I could see and hear them playing while I was in the kitchen, which is where I spent most of my time back then. The kids’ space wasn’t immediately visible to visitors and it was an area that, if left messy, wouldn’t disturb the adults in the house.

As the kids grew older, though, and they didn’t need my eyes on them all the time, it was a relief to move their area upstairs to the loft. Our loft area, a 9’x12′ space at the top of the stairs on the way to the kids’ bedrooms, has been an invaluable area for our kids over the past six years. I have a partially obstructed view of it from my kitchen and I can hear activity in this area from any corner of my house.

Before: Little Kid Space
After: Big Kid Space

Until this Christmas, the loft was home to my kids’ play kitchen. We built it when Brynn was three years old and even as a ten year old this summer, she and Callie were still playing in it. They used it as a restaurant, as a pretend classroom, and sometimes even as a kitchen. Even though the play kitchen was still usable for the girls, we sensed that they were starting to cross into an age where they would appreciate a more mature play space. They weren’t as loud and boisterous anymore when they played in the kitchen. In fact, they were whispering – almost like they didn’t want us to know that they were still using their little kitchen. But what really convinced me was their tendency to raid my craft closet and their inability to put anything away when they were finished.

One day I kind of exploded. No, I totally exploded. It was one of those mom moments you never forget even though you wish you could totally block it out. Callie had been in my craft closet, made a mess, and left it a total disaster. Glue stuck to the table, glitter and paper scraps all over the place. Cardboard scraps strewn on the table and floor. String and ribbon and stickers and sequins everywhere. I had wanted to do a specific task quickly but couldn’t even get into the closet.

I took all of her craft supplies out of the closet and tossed them in her room and told her she could never come back. My closet was off limits to her.

Within seconds I realized how unfair it was. Crafting is what Callie does. Creating purses and houses and bracelets out of cardboard and tape and rubber bands and fabric is who she is. When she can’t create, she starts to burst at the seams. It is who she is. A tinkerer. An artist. A creator.

So I took a deep breath and said, “Here’s the deal. We cannot coexist in this space but you cannot exist without crafts. You need to choose: play kitchen or crafts.” It took her a millisecond to respond, “Crafts!” Brynn agreed.

As much as it hurt to admit that they were growing up, I knew it had to happen. I took photos of their play kitchen and posted them on a local moms’ Facebook page. The kitchen and its contents were gone within a day. We boxed up the little kid toys that we wanted to hang onto for visiting toddlers. We gave away everything else.

Starting with a clean slate, I built a simple divider to make the loft feel more separate from the hallway and to give me a wall to set a dresser against, so that we’d have plenty of storage. The divider is screwed into the floor, the adjacent wall, and the dresser it sits in front of. The dresser is a hand-me-down that I cleaned up and painted – it’s perfect for holding fabric and craft supplies. I moved around some bookcases that were already in the space and I built a table out of bits and pieces in my garage (and a sheet of plywood I had to buy). I made curtains from fabric that I’d found in a pile of remnants a year or so ago. I had set the fabric aside for the next step in the evolution of this space and was glad to find it still sitting in my sewing closet. We stopped into Ikea for a few pieces to help us organize, and for a couple of stools to set at the table.

The divider is a 2×2 frame and 3/8″ plywood leftover from other projects.
I scrubbed the brass pulls with Bar Keeper’s Friend to make them shine!
Construction paper to roll over the table.
Buckets from the dollar aisle at Target and an Ikea BYGEL rail.

We also bought a new computer to put in this space. It wasn’t something we’d planned to do right that very second, but our kids are using computers for more and more homework assignments, and the computer they’d been using was eight years old and running pretty slowly. (For the record, my four year old MacBook works fine…I just don’t like to share it with my children.) We already had a computer cabinet in the loft – it was formerly a TV cabinet, that we converted to a computer cabinet – and it’s been great for them to have an updated machine that I can see and hear from almost anywhere in the house. And I kind of love the giant 27″ screen, even though it’s hard for me to admit.

This TV cabinet was in my house as a kid. It’s solid pine and really heavy! I painted it a few years ago and built the
platform for the computer. The keyboard sits on the pull-out tray that used to hold the TV. Our printer, printer paper,
ink, and camera accessories all fit into the bottom cabinet. And up top is our TV antenna for the whole house. Can
you see the beer cans on it? Classy.

If you don’t count the new computer (ahem) changing this space cost us under $100. We already had almost all of the supplies and sold the old kitchen for $50. This has been, by far, the most impact-per-dollar change we’ve made in our house.

While it was sad to say goodbye to the little kitchen, watching the girls create in this space and knowing that it is a space we can use together has been a nice change for all four of us.

Here are some elements of this space that I think make it effective:

  • I can see and hear it from the kitchen. When the kids are using the computer, I can monitor it.
  • I pass the loft while going to and from the girls’ rooms at night, so I can stop in to clean up any supplies or scraps they leave behind. I’ll never be surprised by a mess there because I have to pass it often.
  • The space may turn into a multi-use space for doing homework as well as crafting, but for now it’s a place where they can leave an unfinished project to return to later, and in the meantime it doesn’t bother anyone. It doesn’t have to be moved out of the way for dinner or for guests.
  • The space is well-lit with lots of natural light and lamps as well as bright and cheery colors. It’s an inspiring place to work.
  • Because the new computer is up there, the kids can turn a movie on Netflix or watch a how-to video on YouTube while they work.
  • The carpet is old, so I don’t really care if they spill on it or screw it up in some other way, as I’m sure they will.
  • The table is finished with nearly bullet-proof PolyWhey floor finish, so it’s easy to clean.
  • For super messy projects, I added a roll of construction paper to a dowel fastened under the table. Now we can roll paper over the table to make cleanup quick and easy.
  • There is plenty of storage. Storage in the hand-me-down dresser, storage in cans hanging from the walls, and storage in the two bookcases we’ve had in our house ever since we got married.
  • A whole wall is dedicated to inspiration and display. Right now a third of that wall is taken up by a Ugandan alphabet which was given to us by a friend who takes care of street kids in Uganda. I added some artwork with positive messages from The Handmade Home and we hung up the kids’ favorite artwork to spur them on to more creativity.

Do you think you could carve out space in your house for a dedicated craft area? Or would a dedicated Lego space go over better in your house? How do you adjust your home to meet your kids’ changing needs?

6 Comments

  1. Hillary it’s beautiful. I love seeing homeowners make the most of the space they have. Crossing my fingers you’ll share the tutorial on that beauty of a work table (you even painted the underside!). Nice work.

    Reply
    • Haha! I did paint the underside! Because I could see it every time I walked up the stairs and it was making my eyes twitch. The legs and apron were actually from a client’s table I re-vamped for them this summer. I just put them back together, painted them teal, and added the biggest sheet of plywood I could for the top (it’s about 4’x5 1/2′), trimmed it out in 1×2 pine. I stained it with super-diluted Antique Oak by General Finishes. It’s my new favorite!

      Reply
  2. I just found your blog through your link on the nesting place and am so excited about you! What a lovely concept and home you have. And you make vegan soup! win.

    Reply
    • Oh, thanks, Jess! I’m so glad to hear from you! Yes…vegan soup. Yum.

      Reply
  3. This is so awesome! I love the idea of a dedicated space for your children to create. And not only is yours functional, but also lovely. I love that big table and the computer hutch that hides away.

    I have to be honest, I would just love a space for me to create at this point (ahhh…. I miss my crafting space so much). But I could see this as a wonderful idea for the future. I sure hope Henry likes to do artsy stuff, too.

    Reply
    • Well, Kim, here’s the secret…I’ve always wanted a space like this too but it’s much easier to attribute its existence to my children than it is to admit that I want to sit in my pajamas and do crafts all day. :)

      Reply

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